Space

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Interplanetary Robots: True Stories of Space Exploration

Rod Pyle

From the first images of Mars Mariner 4 sent back to earth in 1965 to those of Pluto New Horizons captured in its 2015 flyby, the solar system has proved “far less friendly and hospitable than we had hoped, but more fascinating than we could have imagined,” Rod Pyle writes. In Interplanetary Robots: True Stories of Space Exploration, Pyle recounts six decades of headline-making history.

Rod Pyle: Space 2.0

Rod Pyle

SpaceX sent a Crew Dragon spacecraft with cargo to the International Space Station this month. A planned Crew Dragon trip to ISS later this year will put two NASW astronauts in space for the first time since 2011. In SPACE 2.0: How Private Spaceflight, a Resurgent NASA, and International Partners are Creating a New Space Age, Rod Pyle conveys the excitement of the next era of space exploration.

Robert Zimmerman

In the Apollo 8 mission, December 21, 1968, humans left earth’s gravity for the first time, and flew to the moon, circling it 10 times. They took now-iconic photos from space. To mark Apollo 8’s 50th anniversary, Robert Zimmerman collaborated with a fan of his 1998 book_ Genesis: The Story of Apollo 8: The First Manned Flight to Another World_ to produce the work’s first ebook and audio versions.

Carolyn Collins Petersen

Space exploration isn’t just a technological story, Carolyn Collins Petersen asserts. Literature and art helped fuel interest, education, and funding. Jules Vernes’ From the Earth to the Moon, one of many examples, inspired future rocket designers. Many Trekkies now work at NASA. In Space Exploration: Past, Present, Future, Peterson examines what it takes to build a space-faring civilization.

Rod Pyle

Award-winning science writer and documentarian Rod Pyle presents an insider's perspective on the most unusual and bizarre space missions ever devised inside and outside of NASA. The incredible projects described here were not merely flights of fancy dreamed up by space enthusiasts, but actual missions planned by leading aeronautical engineers. Some were designed but not built; others were built but not flown; and a few were flown to failure but little reported:

Nancy Atkinson

In Incredible Stories from Space, veteran space journalist Nancy Atkinson shares compelling insights from over 35 NASA scientists and engineers, taking readers behind the scenes of the unmanned missions that are transforming our understanding of the solar system and beyond. Weaving together one-on-one interviews along with the extraordinary sagas of the spacecraft themselves, this book chronicles the struggles and triumphs of nine current space missions and captures the true spirit of exploration and discovery. Full color images throughout reveal scientific discoveries and the stunning, breathtaking views of our universe, sent back to Earth by our robotic emissaries to the cosmos.

Matt Bille and Erika Lishock

The First Space Race reveals the inside story of an epic adventure with world-altering stakes. From 1955 to 1958, American and Soviet engineers battled to capture the world’s imagination by successfully launching the world’s first satellite.

The race to orbit featured two American teams led by rival services — the Army and the Navy — and a Soviet effort so secret that few even knew it existed. This race ushered in the Space Age with a saga of science, politics, technology, engineering, and human dreams.

Sandy Antunes

If you’ve ever fantasized about building a satellite in your basement and sending it into orbit, this is the book for you. Sandy Antunes spent two years building his Project Calliope satellite. In DIY instruments for amateur space, the third of a planned four-book series, Antunes discusses what you can measure in orbit.

Sandy Antunes

For years, schools and universities have had rocket clubs, where amateur scientists could create and fly their own homemade rockets. Now, amateurs are also building picosatellites, microsatellites of low mass and size that are made with inexpensive materials and can be launched into low-earth orbit. These picosatellites can be used for running scientific experiments, university research, art projects, or just for fun. Of course, after a picosatellite has been created, is it ready for launch?