Nancy Marie Brown


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Song of the Vikings, Palgrave Macmillan 2012

Song of the Vikings: Snorri and the Making of Norse Myths (Palgrave Macmillan 2012)

Snorri Sturluson, the thirteenth-century Icelandic chieftain who gave us Odin, Loki, and Thor, was as unruly as the Norse gods he created.

Much like Greek and Roman mythology, Norse myths are still with us. Famous storytellers from JRR Tolkien to Neil Gaiman have drawn their inspiration from tales of the long-haired, mead-drinking, marauding and pillaging Vikings. Their creator is a thirteenth-century Icelandic chieftain by the name of Snorri Sturluson. Like Homer, Snorri was a bard, collecting and embellishing the folklore and pagan legends of medieval Scandinavia. Unlike Homer, Snorri was a man of the world--a wily political power player. One of the richest men in Iceland, he came close to ruling it and even closer to betraying it. In Song of the Vikings, author Nancy Marie Brown brings Snorri Sturluson's story to life.

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Click here to watch the book trailer on YouTube.

Read more about Song of the Vikings on Nancy Marie Brown's blog, "God of Wednesday."

Ask your local bookseller to order Song of the Vikings, ISBN 978-0-230-33884-5.

Or click here to buy online.

For an autographed copy, contact Kim at Green Mountain Books and Prints: greenmountain@myfairpoint.net or (802) 626-5051.


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The Abacus and the Cross, Basic Books 2010

The Abacus and the Cross: The Story of the Pope Who Brought the Light of Science to the Dark Ages (Basic 2010)

In the Year 1000, the earth wasn't flat. People weren't terrified that the world would end at the turn of the millennium. Christians didn't believe Muslims and Jews were their mortal enemies. The Church wasn't anti-science. The popular picture of the Dark Ages is wrong. In fact, science was central to the lives of monks, kings, and even popes a thousand years ago. The pope of the year 1000--Gerbert of Aurillac, known as Pope Sylvester II--was the leading mathematician and astronomer of his day.

Called The Scientist Pope, Gerbert of Aurillac rose from peasant beginnings to lead the church--thanks in large part to his knowledge of science and his love of books. As a youth, he studied mathematics and astronomy on the border of Islamic Spain, where science texts in Arabic were just then beginning to be translated into Latin. A professor of mathematics at a French cathedral for most of his career, he was the first Christian known to teach math using the nine Arabic numerals and zero. He wrote treatises on acoustics and logic, made celestial spheres for studying the stars, investigated the astrolabe, and tutored kings and emperors. He was a spy, a traitor, a kingmaker, and a visionary.

A fascinating narrative of one remarkable math teacher, The Abacus and the Cross will captivate readers of history, science, and religion alike. As she reconstructs the strangely illuminated Europe of the Dark Ages, Nancy Marie Brown reminds us that the major conflicts in our world today--between Christianity and Islam, between religion and science--are products of our own age, not historical inevitabilities.

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Read more about The Abacus and the Cross on Nancy Marie Brown's blog, "God of Wednesday."

Ask your local bookseller to order The Abacus and the Cross, ISBN 978-0465031443.

Or click here to buy online.

For an autographed copy, contact Kim at Green Mountain Books and Prints: greenmountain@myfairpoint.net or (802) 626-5051.


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The Far Traveler, Harcourt Books 2007

The Far Traveler: Voyages of a Viking Woman (Harcourt 2007)

Five hundred years before Columbus, a Viking woman named Gudrid sailed off the edge of the known world. She landed in the New World and lived there for three years, giving birth to a baby before sailing home. Or so the Icelandic sagas say. Even after archaeologists found a Viking longhouse in Newfoundland, no one believed that the details of Gudrid's story were true. Then, in 2001, a team of scientists discovered what may have been this pioneering woman's last house, buried under a hay field in Iceland, just where the sagas suggested it could be.

Joining scientists experimenting with cutting-edge technology and the latest archaeological techniques, and tracing Gudrid's steps on land and in the sagas, Nancy Marie Brown reconstructs a life that spanned--and expanded--the bounds of the then-known world. She sheds new light on the society that gave rise to a woman even more extraordinary than legend has painted her ... and illuminates the reasons for its collapse.

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Read more about The Far Traveler on Nancy Marie Brown's blog, "God of Wednesday."

Ask your local bookseller to order The Far Traveler, ISBN 978-0156033978.

Or click here to buy online.

For an autographed copy, contact Kim at Green Mountain Books and Prints: greenmountain@myfairpoint.net or (802) 626-5051.


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Mendel in the Kitchen, Joseph Henry Books 2004

Mendel in the Kitchen: A Scientist's View of Genetically Modified Food (Joseph Henry 2004)

In the 1700s people thought potatoes caused leprosy and that planting them ruined the soil. In the 1800s people in America thought tomatoes were only good for feeding to pigs. In early America, grafting (like molecular techniques today) was called "wicked" and condemned for interfering with God's plan. Without grafting we would not have navel oranges or any of our popular varieties of apples or plums. When hybrid corn was invented in 1909 it was called "dangerous" and was said to do "violence to the nature of the plant." By 1970, 96 percent of all U.S. corn was hybrid corn. The most popular red grapefruit, Rio Red, was created by exposing grapefruit buds to thermal neutron radiation at Brookhaven National Lab in 1968.

For more than 10,000 years farmers have been modifying plants' genes. To change a wild plant into a food plant, and to increase its yield, means changing the plant's genes. In Mendel in the Kitchen, Nina Fedoroff, a leading expert in plant molecular biology and genetics, looks at the many issues raised by contemporary techniques for modifying food plants. She and her co-author, Nancy Marie Brown, weave a narrative rich in history and science to answer the most commonly asked questions about GMO foods--and some we didn't think to ask.

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Ask your local bookseller to order Mendel in the Kitchen, ISBN 978-0-309-09738-3.

Or click here to buy online.

For an autographed copy, contact Kim at Green Mountain Books and Prints: greenmountain@myfairpoint.net or (802) 626-5051.


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A Good Horse Has No Color, Stackpole Books 2001

A Good Horse Has No Color: Searching Iceland for the Perfect Horse (Stackpole 2001)

A good horse can make its rider "king for a while," according to Icelandic poetry. But finding a good horse requires a keen and practiced eye. One must see beyond the obvious attributes--appearance, color, and size--to discern a horse's true personality and temperament. Nancy Marie Brown puts her eye to the test when she travels to Iceland to find the perfect Icelandic horse she can bring home to her Pennsylvania farm and make her own.

She arrives in Iceland shaken by tragedy, uncertain of the language, lacking confidence in her riding skills; but she's determined to make her search a success. She finds inspiration in the country's austere and majestic landscape, which is alive with the ghosts of an adventure-filled past. In the glacier-carved hinterland, she rides a variety of Icelandic horses--some spirited, willful, even heroic; others docile, trusting, or tame. She also meets an assortment of horse owners, who can be as independent as the animals they breed.

Evocative, clear-headed, and richly described, this book is for anyone who has at some time in their life searched for something perfect.

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Read more about A Good Horse Has No Color on Nancy Marie Brown's blog, "God of Wednesday."

A Good Horse Has No Color is now available in paperback. Ask your local bookseller to order ISBN 978-1-490-52531-0

Click here to buy online.

For an autographed copy, contact Kim at Green Mountain Books and Prints: greenmountain@myfairpoint.net or (802) 626-5051.


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