Clark/Payne Award

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Clark/Payne Award

The winner of the 2015 Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award, an annual prize for young science journalists, is Madhumita Venkataramanan, now head of technology coverage for the Telegraph in London. Venkataramanan received the award and its $1,000 prize for two stories in Wired (“My Identity for Sale” and “Welcome to BrainGate”) and one story for the BBC (“The Superpower Police Now Use to Tackle Crime.”)

The winner of the 2014 Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award, an annual prize for young science journalists, is Azeen Ghorayshi. Ghorayshi received the award and its $1,000 prize for “Bio Hackers,” a story in the East Bay Express about the “small but growing community of hackers, tinkerers and off-hours science enthusiasts” who are genetically engineering organisms in their garages and basements; and “Choking to Death in Tehran,” a story in Newsweek about smog in Iran.

The Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists is going online. The Council for the Advancement of Science Writing is now managing judging and presentation of this award, which recognizes outstanding reporting and writing by a young journalist covering any field of science. For details and entry instructions, visit http://casw.org/evert-clark-award.

The winner of the 2012 Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award, an annual prize for young science journalists, is Gayathri Vaidyanathan. Vaidyanathan received the award and its $1,000 prize for two stories in Nature, “The Wheat Stalker” and “The Cultured Chimpanzees;” one story in Greenwire,“Study ignites fresh concerns about drilling emissions;” and a story in Energywire, “Could risk analysis prevent future deepwater disasters?”

The winner of the 2007 Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award, an annual prize for young science journalists, is Jia-Rui Chong. A staff writer at The Los Angeles Times, Chong received the award and its $1000 prize for four stories: "Badminton World Isn't Smiling for These Birdies;" "Alaska villagers living in bird flu's flight path;" "Book with a buried treasure;" and "First warmer, then sicker."