ScienceWriters bookstore

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The NASW bookstore sells books, music, video, software, and other merchandise via Amazon.com. Every purchase you make on Amazon can support NASW programs and services: Just go to https://www.nasw.org/amazon when you start your shopping. Books featured below were written by NASW members or reviewed in ScienceWriters magazine. Appearance here does not indicate endorsement.

Deborah Blum, Mary Knudson, Robin Marantz Henig

The best guide for teaching and learning effective science writing, this second edition of A Field Guide for Science Writers improves on the classic first edition with a wider range of topics, a new slate of writers, and an up-to-date exploration of the most stimulating and challenging issues in science.

Writers of SciLance

Not sure how to start your career as a science writer, or how to take your existing career to the next level? The Science Writers’ Handbook is here to help. In this essential guide, 35 leading science writers share their hard-won wisdom and illuminating stories, going beyond the basics to cover everything else you need to survive and thrive as a science writer.

DNA Nation

Sergio Pistoi

“You may discover things about yourself and/or your family members that may be upsetting or cause anxiety and that you may not have the ability to change.” People ordering DNA tests often overlook the small print, Sergio Pistoi writes in DNA Nation: How Internet of Genes is Changing Your Life. Afterward, he notes, they may regret that. An estimated 2-10 percent of paternities are misattributed.

Exercise is Medicine

Judy Foreman

“It’s not just that physical activity is good for you. It’s that a sedentary lifestyle, as a totally separate variable, is seriously bad, Judy Foreman writes in Exercise is Medicine: How Physical Activity Boosts Health and Slows Aging. Moderate exercise 30 minutes a day, five days a week, she says, increases lifespan by 3.5 years. Are you sitting down now? —Read this fast, then take a walk.

The Wildlife Confessional

The Wildlife Society Western Section

In The Wildlife Confessional—Kick It in the Ice Hole and Other Stories, NASW member and wildlife biologist Matthew Bettelheim and the late writer/wildlife biologist Thomas Roberts offer a multi-authored collection of tales and reflections on encounters with birds, bears, and more in diverse locales. Funds from book sales will help support student scholarships, grants, and training opportunities.

ALINE AND VALCOUR

Marquis de Sade. Translated, with an introduction by John Galbraith Simmons (NASW Member) and Jocelyne Geneviève Barque

Science writer John Galbraith Simmons and his wife Jocelyne Geneviève Barque provide the first English translation of a 900-page epistolary novel by French author Marquis de Sade, written while Sade was imprisoned in the 1580s. Aline and Valcour combines picaresque adventures, satire, and black humor to illuminate societal injustices that persist today, including exploitation of women.

Rethinking Evolution

Gene Levinson

The classical concept of Darwinian natural selection does not encompass the varieties of new structures and functions that arise when separate entities interact in useful ways, Gene Levinson asserts in Rethinking Evolution: The Revolution That’s Hiding in Plain Sight. His updated evolutionary theory, he says, reflects recent discoveries in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology.

What the Dog Knows

Cat Warren

In What the Dog Knows, Cat Warren tells how she transformed her rambunctious German shepherd, Solo, recognized as having a “good nose,” into a cadaver dog. Warren gives young readers an introduction to the science of scent and the process of training dogs to follow a scent through a swamp, below ground, and even below the surface of a lake in this adaptation of her 2013 book on the same topic.

City in a Forest

Ginger Pinholster

In City in a Forest, the first novel by Ginger Pinholster, longtime PIO for AAAS, two women strive to prevent a developer from building luxury condos on verdant but lead-contaminated land near their childhood homes. One of the women works as a PIO for an environmental non-profit, while the other, an artist, draws on personal and cultural history to produce her fanciful sculptures and masks.