ScienceWriters bookstore

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The NASW bookstore sells books, music, video, software, and other merchandise via Amazon.com. Every purchase you make on Amazon can support NASW programs and services: Just go to https://www.nasw.org/amazon when you start your shopping. Books featured below were written by NASW members or reviewed in ScienceWriters magazine. Appearance here does not indicate endorsement.

Deborah Blum, Mary Knudson, Robin Marantz Henig

The best guide for teaching and learning effective science writing, this second edition of A Field Guide for Science Writers improves on the classic first edition with a wider range of topics, a new slate of writers, and an up-to-date exploration of the most stimulating and challenging issues in science.

Writers of SciLance

Not sure how to start your career as a science writer, or how to take your existing career to the next level? The Science Writers’ Handbook is here to help. In this essential guide, 35 leading science writers share their hard-won wisdom and illuminating stories, going beyond the basics to cover everything else you need to survive and thrive as a science writer.

The Cheating Cell

Athena Aktipis

Cancer cells act in the body like bad roommates, Athena Aktipis writes in The Cheating Cell: How Evolution Helps Us Understand and Treat Cancer. They stop cooperating, over-use resources, and invade every space in the house. Cancer is the literal embodiment of evolution, Aktipis says. We can’t win a war against a process of evolution, she says, but altering it may make cancer easier to tolerate.

They Are Already Here

Sarah Scoles

According to a 2019 Gallup poll, 33% of U.S. adults believe alien spacecraft visiting Earth from other planets or galaxies account for some UFO sightings. About 16% of Americans claim to have seen a UFO. “What intrigued me most was not the UFOs,” Sarah Scoles relates. “It was the people obsessed with UFOs.” She tells their stories in They Are Already Here: UFO Culture and Why We See Saucers.

Electric Brain

Douglas Fields

People who manifest a specific pattern of brain activity while letting their minds wander can learn a second language more easily than those who don’t show it. A computer interpreting brainwaves can generate speech that sounds “as clear as Alexa,” Douglas Fields relates in Electric Brain: How the New Science of Brainwaves Reads Minds, Tells Us How We Learn, and Helps Us Change for the Better.

Friendship

Lydia Denworth

A child reports having a best friend and a worst friend (no friend at all). Adults typically need 40-60 hours of being together to form a casual friendship and 200+ hours to rate someone as a best friend. Maintaining close relationships boosts quality of life and benefits our health, Lydia Denworth writes In Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life’s Fundamental Bond,

The Craft of Science Writing

Multiple contributors, edited by Siri Carpenter

Who is a science journalist and how do you become one? What makes a science story and how do you find one? How do you report a science story? How do you tell your story? How do you build expertise in science writing? —The Craft of Science Writing: Selections from The Open Notebook edited by Siri Carpenter, TON co-founder, provides 30+ articles delving into these concerns, many by NASW members.

DNA Nation

Sergio Pistoi

“You may discover things about yourself and/or your family members that may be upsetting or cause anxiety and that you may not have the ability to change.” People ordering DNA tests often overlook the small print, Sergio Pistoi writes in DNA Nation: How Internet of Genes is Changing Your Life. Afterward, he notes, they may regret that. An estimated 2-10 percent of paternities are misattributed.

Exercise is Medicine

Judy Foreman

“It’s not just that physical activity is good for you. It’s that a sedentary lifestyle, as a totally separate variable, is seriously bad, Judy Foreman writes in Exercise is Medicine: How Physical Activity Boosts Health and Slows Aging. Moderate exercise 30 minutes a day, five days a week, she says, increases lifespan by 3.5 years. Are you sitting down now? —Read this fast, then take a walk.