New to science writing

NASW student members looking for great internships, or news and science organizations looking for top interns should plan to attend the 2016 NASW Internship Fair. The fair will be held 1-5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 13, at the 2016 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting in Washington, D.C. Read on for important preparation details.

Julia Rosen draws from her own experience and from interviews with other scientists-turned-science-writers for a guide to making the move from academia to journalism. She also discusses her own motives for making the big switch: "Although I had excelled in science classes as an undergraduate, I was unprepared for the drudgery of lab work, and the funnel of ever-narrower research questions that felt ever more removed from the questions that motivated me at the outset."

The traditional path to a newsroom job starts with journalism school and, at most, a master's degree. But there's another way that starts with the lab and a science doctorate, writes Robert Irion, who directs the science communication program at the University of California-Santa Cruz: "My graduates agreed that it's not necessary to complete a PhD to be a successful science communicator. It's a competitive realm, however, and the degree can help open some job doors."

The National Association of Science Writers (NASW) is once again sponsoring travel fellowships for undergraduate students interested in science journalism, to attend the upcoming American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting in Chicago. As many as 10 students will receive $500 to $1,000 in travel expense reimbursement for attending AAAS, which will be held Feb. 13-17, 2014.

NASW student members looking for great internships, or news and science organizations looking for top interns should plan to attend the 2014 NASW Internship Fair. The fair will be held Saturday, Feb. 15, from 1 to 5 p.m. at the 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Chicago. Read on for important preparation details.

Next summer may still be a year away, but Poynter's Dan Caterinicchia says it's not too soon to start preparing for the hunt: "That preparation should include meticulously researching markets where you may want to intern and establishing portfolios with examples that show you’ll be ready to start producing professional-grade content from day one." Caterinicchia's guide includes helpful "do" and "don't" tips from editors at three intern-hiring journalism organizations.