ScienceWriters bookstore

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The NASW bookstore sells books, music, video, software, and other merchandise via Amazon.com. Every purchase helps support NASW programs and services. Books featured below were written by NASW members or reviewed in ScienceWriters magazine. Appearance here does not indicate endorsement.

Carol Svec

Some low-frequency sounds — such as noise from storms or truck engines — can make you feel dizzy and nauseated. An index finger’s light touch can stop people from losing balance. You are more prone to trip when you think someone is watching you. A breakthrough in improving balance as we age might just come through the study of the Achilles tendon. A person gets “falling down drunk” due to a tiny structure in the inner ear that floats when it becomes soaked in alcohol.

Mark Pendergrast

In the 1990s, a faddish pseudoscience, repressed memory theory, destroyed millions of American families by creating false memories of childhood sexual abuse. At the time, Mark Pendergrast published his widely acclaimed book Victims of Memory, exposing the false nature of the science and counseling techniques that were alienating teenagers and grown children from their families. In Memory Warp, Pendergrast revisits that subject, updating his research and describing where it stands now, in 2017

Mark Pendergrast

This book offers a comprehensive overview of the concept of repressed memories. It provides a history and context that documents key events that have had an effect on the way that modern psychology and psychotherapy have developed. Chapters provide an overview of how human memory functions and works and examine facets of the misguided theories behind repressed memory.

Julie Rehmeyer

Julie fully expected to be breathing at the end of the trip ― but driving into Death Valley felt like giving up, surrendering. She’d spent years battling a mysterious illness so extreme that she often couldn’t turn over in her bed. The top specialists in the world were powerless to help, and research on her disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, was at a near standstill.

Eleanor Spicer Rice, Alex Wild, Rob Dunn

Did you know that for every human on earth, there are about one million ants? They are among the longest-lived insects — with some ant queens passing the 30-year mark — as well as some of the strongest. Fans of both the city and countryside alike, ants decompose dead wood, turn over soil (in some places more than earthworms), and even help plant forests by distributing seeds. But while fewer than 30 of the nearly 1,000 ant species living in North America are true pests, we cringe when we see them marching across our kitchen floors.

Maryn McKenna

In this eye-opening exposé, acclaimed health journalist and National Geographic contributor Maryn McKenna documents how antibiotics transformed chicken from local delicacy to industrial commodity — and human health threat — uncovering the ways we can make America's favorite meat safer again.

Ricki Lewis

Today, human genetics is for everyone. It is about variation more than about illnesses, and increasingly about the common rather than about the rare. Once an obscure science or an occasional explanation for an odd collection of symptoms, human genetics is now part of everyday conversation. By coming to know genetic backgrounds, people can control their environments in more healthy ways. Genetic knowledge is, therefore, both informative and empowering. This edition of Human Genetics: Concepts and Applications shows students how and why that is true.