Antunes: DIY Instruments for Amateur Space

DIY INSTRUMENTS FOR AMATEUR SPACE:
INVENTING UTILITY FOR YOUR SPACECRAFT
ONCE IT ACHIEVES ORBIT

Sandy Antunes
O'Reilly Media, March 2013, $4.99 print/$2.99 ebook
ISBNs: Print, 978-1-4493-1064-6, Ebook 978-1-4493-1063-9

Contact info:

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Antunes writes:

INSTRUMENTS is my 3rd book in a four-book series on "Do It Yourself DIY Space," based originally on my Science20.com DIY blog.

Sandy Antunes

The series arose in 2009 when a lone freelance scientist (me) decided to see if one person of average competence (also me) could build a satellite in their basement, leading to the Project Calliope satellite. After blogging on the build for two years, I completed the satellite.

Shopping the idea of publishing the 'lessons learned' and how-to (minus all the mistakes) as a book or series made sense. O'Reilly Media/Maker Press was the first place my agent recommended.

This "Instrumentation" book is about hobby-level sensors, but also is covertly a guide to remote sensing and sensors of all types. It tackles sensor roles in earth, solar, planetary and astronomy use.

The work is drawn from my operations work in high energy astrophysics on the science side as well as general principles arising from basic physics and observation. Filling in the earth-observing details took a bit of research, but fortunately that part of the material was also needed for a course I was teaching. In a circular fashion, that teaching occurred because Capitol College in Laurel, Maryland, had hired me in 2011 in part due to my build experiences with Calliope.

So a freelancer writes a book that teaches others how to do what I now teach students so they can do it better.

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May. 2, 2013

Advance Copy

For this column, NASW book editor Lynne Lamberg asks NASW authors to tell how they came up with the idea for their book, developed a proposal, found an agent and publisher, funded and conducted research, and put the book together. She also asks what they wish they had known before they began working on their book, what they might do differently the next time, and what tips they can offer aspiring authors. She then edits the A part of that Q&A to produce the author reports you see here.

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